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#1: Traditional recipes Author: AetherLocation: Americas, Italy PostPosted: Wed May 28, 2008 2:53 pm
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"CHICHERATA" ?.
The mysterious spelling, probably variations in different dialects. Sounded like that, could have "k" from greek?

Reading the posts on Marano Marchesato - wonderful- made me think about this beautiful, and wummy dish, we used to have for Christmas at my grandparents.

I had kitchen duty on Feast times and learned to assemble this dish. However, I was not around when the dough was prepared. I know that had flower, wine, eggs and not much sugar. I need the measurements!

Once the dough was ready, it was rolled about a finger thick and cut in small pieces ( I guess the name comes from "ceci" or "chiche" = gran turco), that size.

The pieces of dough were fried in some very light oil, and drained very well on paper - until dry.

In a pan enough honey was kept very hot, but not boiling- the pieces of dough were then placed in the honey, and cooked for a few minutes.

Removed, drained but not much, and placed while hot on fresh orange leaves, and displayed on some beautiful dish. The hot honey absorbed the
beautiful orange fragrance, and was lovely to look at!

I somehow think that perhaps Cathy knows this desert! Just a feeling...

Aether Wink

#2: Re: Traditional recipes Author: AetherLocation: Americas, Italy PostPosted: Wed May 28, 2008 2:57 pm
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Quick = dessert!, not desert! I am a very bad typist!

#3: Re: Traditional recipes Author: Cathy PostPosted: Wed May 28, 2008 11:04 pm
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Aether - you are absolutely correct!! I remember making this as a child! We called it something like "pinalotta" (I can say it not spell it Embarassed ) It was slightly different but similiar. I do not remember wine in the recipie but I do remember the dough rolled into little balls about the size of Ceci. And the hot honey!! I will get the recipie from my dad this weekend and post it here. Very Happy Good memories!

#4: Re: Traditional recipes Author: AetherLocation: Americas, Italy PostPosted: Thu May 29, 2008 12:04 am
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Cathy,
I knew it! A lady from Cerzeto told me today that she has done this , but in Cerzeto they have another name for it, and it is done like the dough rolled and about the size of a ring finger - to imitate some kind of shell fish from Calabria!
I believe she said something like "scalini"? I think I saw that in the recipes of
M. Marchesato - will check , or will not sleep.
When I get one of those intuitions I have to go all the way!

Thanks for checking! kiss
Sophia

#5: Re: Traditional recipes Author: Cathy PostPosted: Thu May 29, 2008 12:38 am
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By the way - we always had it at Christmas too - and Easter! There is a bakery near me that sells it. I wish I could remember where!! Embarassed

#6: Re: Traditional recipes Author: AetherLocation: Americas, Italy PostPosted: Thu May 29, 2008 12:54 am
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Cathy,
In Marano Marchesato blog they have posted 3 recipes for: are you ready" 1-Scaliddre 1, 2, and 3, and then the same for Scalidi. The dough is the same, small varitions of spices, And one lady mentions he Nanna knitting the dough with a knitting needdle! But difficult - must look nice.

What do you think if we start a "Calabrese Cook Book", by Gente di Mare people? Of course all very low cal!

Sophia Shocked hide neclord

#7: Re: Traditional recipes Author: ElevenLocation: New York PostPosted: Thu May 29, 2008 12:58 am
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Cathy..do you mean struffoli? The honey balls with the confetti? I believe some people call that pinalata (which I am sure we are spelling wrong..lol

I have also had strips of dough, fried then covered with honey. My family didnt make that, but I have had it elsewhere. I dont think there was wine in it tho.

Anyway..I have a struffoli recipe that will knock your socks off...they arent hard like little bricks..they are very soft...not to mention fattening, since you wont eat just a few.

#8: Re: Traditional recipes Author: Cathy PostPosted: Thu May 29, 2008 1:00 am
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Isn't honey and dough low calorie? Shocked hide
I would love to see the recipie!!

#9: Re: Traditional recipes Author: nucciaLocation: Toronto, Ontario, Canada PostPosted: Thu May 29, 2008 2:00 am
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We also called them Scalidi. But if I recall, mom uses white vermouth in them. I need to ask her. She makes them every Christmas.

I will also ask her for the recipe.

#10: Re: Traditional recipes Author: AetherLocation: Americas, Italy PostPosted: Thu May 29, 2008 2:36 am
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OK! OK! Eleven!

Out with the recipe for struffoli! About pinalata - the problem is that we know how it sounds, but to spell is another story.

A cousin of mine from Rende makes something that she calls "Pizza Impigliata" also for holidays. Could it be the "pinalata" for short?
It is like a pizza, size of a dessert plate, covered with caramelized fruits, nutella, and all sort of low cal goodies!

Aether Smile

#11: Re: Traditional recipes Author: ElevenLocation: New York PostPosted: Thu May 29, 2008 1:09 pm
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OK, this is my recipe..just some tips, first. The recipe is big because when I make this, its shared between 4 families (me and my kids).

When adding the flour, be sure not to dump it all in as this is an Italian recipe with no real measurements, they are all approximate..so it may take less or more flour.

These have to sink then immediately float on the oil, so you need a couple of inches at least..in a pot (not frying pan as the oil froths up.) If they dont immediately rise to the top, the oil isnt hot enough yet. I also change the oil, once or twice. You probably need over a quart of oil.

Once fried and ready for honey, they will fill a 8-10 quart pot. Dont use plastic as they will melt it. I use a huge slotted spoon to get them out of the oil.You can cut the recipe if its too big. You also can honey them as needed..since if you honey them all, by the time you get to the last of them, all of the honey has soaked in.

Also, when I say roll and cut..you take a piece of dough, roll it on the table like a big snake about the thickness of your pinky. You then slice them with a knife, about every half inch. These grow about double in size..so you have to judge with your first fry, if you want them bigger or smaller and cut accordingly. I always test a few first. Um..I make these with hubby..he is the cutter, I am the fry person.

I got this recipe after tasting them at a friends house about 35 years ago. Its her moms recipe and puts to shame any other I used prior.


STRUFFOLI

12 eggs
8 cups flour (about)
1 cup oil
1 cup sugar
1 tsp salt
1 tsp vanilla
12 teaspoon baking powder

oil
honey
confetti

Mix wet ingredients and sugar,
add baking powder
add flour little at a time.
knead till no white flecks.
roll and cut.
heat oil.
fry till brown.

mix with honey
top with confetti

#12: Re: Traditional recipes Author: ElevenLocation: New York PostPosted: Thu May 29, 2008 1:13 pm
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Ok, I think this is the correct spelling for pinalata...Pignolata.

I found it and a recipe on the net. Its a variation of my struffoli recipe. It is the honeyballs. I knew that..since I know people who call struffoli that. I guess, different regions, same thing, different name.

#13: Re: Traditional recipes Author: AetherLocation: Americas, Italy PostPosted: Thu May 29, 2008 2:43 pm
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Eleven,

What about the link for the recipe? Want to be the only one to enjoy it?
We want it!!! Mouth watering! Sounds yummy!
And the other?

Aether Question Question Question

#14: Re: Traditional recipes Author: ElevenLocation: New York PostPosted: Thu May 29, 2008 3:40 pm
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www.recipezaar.com/106526

#15: Re: Traditional recipes Author: AetherLocation: Americas, Italy PostPosted: Thu May 29, 2008 4:23 pm
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Eleven,

Thanks! The nutrition facts are really impressive! WOW! I love the honesty!
There goes my good marks. OK, once a year for Christmas...

Aether Crying or Very sad Crying or Very sad



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